Three Leaders

As you may read on the blogs of Glendon’s eAmbassadors, on Feb. 1, 2014 we had a Leadership Conference at Glendon College. There were different presenters, but three (3) in particular stood out to me:

Joseph Lavoie

Joseph Lavoie

1. Joseph Lavoie (@josephlavoie) – Joseph delivered an amazing keynote address in which he suggested a different way to approach networking. The thing that stood out to me most in his address:  be authentic. Authenticity in your interactions is so important. I see authenticity as an element that helps give your network robustness and longevity. Right now, my network is small, but that’s ok. I’m building it slowly to ensure that my connections and I have a two way relationship, and so that I am affiliated with communities that represent me.

Courtney Mallam

Courtney Mallam

2. Courtney Mallam (@CourtneyMallam) – Courtney is my boss, the strong leader behind our eAmbassadors. I attended her session about developing your digital presence with purpose and intention. The thing that stood out to me most: who you are online should also be who you are offline. Sometimes we forget that things that make it online often stay online – it can be hard to get rid of content about yourself you don’t want online. I have learned to wait 5 minutes or even 1 hour before responding to something that gets me fired up! I don’t want to be known as a firecracker online or offline, so it’s important that I think before I speak (or type).

David Ip Yam

Daivd Ip Yam

3. David Ip Yam (@davidipyam) – David delivered the closing address for the conference. He is an assistant at Student Affairs at Glendon. David delivered and inspiring talk about leadership as a lifestyle. The thing that stood out to me most: when you stretch your limits, you establish new norms for yourself. I love this! It speaks to so many of those inspirations that we lose when we enter “the real world” but are actually the key to living your dreams and being engaged with the world around you. David spoke about taking small steps everyday to achieving the goals you set out for yourself, and also about having a plan. He also spoke about choices – you choose your life. Doing what you are passionate about requires sacrifices – you may not get to watch TV as often as you want or going drinking every weekend – but that is the choice you make to rise above mediocrity.

I will be making some changes to my online presence based on what I have learned. The biggest challenge for me is overcoming my fears. But I don’t want to be silent as life passes me by, or apathetic to the world around me. I know I want to be a voice and contribute to shaping the world around me.

Ttyl,

Neena

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Yes you should follow your dreams, but be prepared to face your fears

When I decided to return back to school it was so that I could create the career of my dreams. I have always wanted to work as a diplomat. To build this career, I made a plan. First, I wanted to complete a degree  in International Studies. Although I have one degree from the University of Toronto, I opted to complete a second degree at Glendon College; to improve my research, writing and critical thought. I will complete graduate studies  after my second BA and ultimately pursue my PhD and a career with the Canadian Foreign Service. As I am in my thirties, I do have quite a bit of work experience. When I am applying for internships I am often unsure if this works in my favour. I think that more often that not, internships are intended for students who lack work experience. I have work experience, with many transferable skills. I don’t have much of experience in the field I want a career in – International Relations – and so, much of my extra time is being spent trying to accumulate that experience. I am putting myself out there, applying for every possible opportunity to try and catch my break and have a door open (so to speak). Continue reading